Hypertension – Telling My Spouse The Bad News And The Good News

I left my doctors office two hours after arriving. I decided I would drive to my wife’s work and tell her in person the bad news and the good news about my health. Rather than just sitting around and talking we went for a walk and talk.

Honey I have some good news and some bad news, Let me give you the short version during our walk starting with the bad news;

I have high blood pressure that is off the charts.

My food consumption can not have more than 1500 mg a day of sodium.

Dining out at restaurants is history for me.

Dried spices have sodium so I can’t use them anymore.

I will probably have to take medication for the rest of my life.

This information explains a lot of things that were happening to me such as why am I getting headaches when I ate certain foods. When I looked back, my blood pressure had probably been high for some time and high sodium foods like wings, burgers with fries and meat lover pizza probably pushed my blood pressure to numbers so high I would dare not imagine.

As a proud man, I have never wanted to be told how I must live my life. Success or failure is something I want to be able to control. Now I must take medication everyday if I want to live. The internal argument was a short one. It was almost a monologue, take the pills and live.

Now for the good news.

I found out I have high blood pressure before anything really bad happened to me. This will be confirmed by a cardiologist over the next few days.

We can push away the silent killer many decades if we do this right.

There are many restaurants that serve crappy food now I have a reason not to eat at any of them.

I can continue running and working out.

When I was eight years old my mom went away on a girls weekend and my dad had to do all the cooking. It was the worst week of my life as it pertains to food. I begged my mom to teach me how to cook food. My favorite class during high school was home economics as all we did was learn about food and cooking. During my college days and working days, food was always on my mind and we ate some amazing meals. This was all preparation for this chapter of my life.

Cooking food without using dried spices will be a significant challenge. Food will have to be flavored with vegetables, fruits and meats. This will be an awesome way to change the way I eat and taste food.

Follow my life as I deal with being recently diagnosed (April 12 2011) with high blood pressure (224/109). I need to lose 100 pounds while changing my food habits to reduce my sodium intake to under 1500 mg and eat foods without preservatives.

Healthy Diet For Long Term Weight Loss Success

Weight loss is all about burning more calories than you eat, but what’s the best way to do that? Knowing the basics of how to lose weight, how to exercise for weight loss and how to motivate yourself are essential for creating a program that works for you. If you’ve ever tried to lose weight, you know it can be a difficult process. But, there are ways to make it easier. Understanding exactly what you need to do to lose weight is your first step

Despite what you may think, losing weight isn’t a mysterious process. In fact, weight loss doesn’t even have to involve strange diets, special exercises or even the ‘magic’ of pills or fitness gadgets. Want the secret to weight loss? Make small changes each and every day and you’ll slowly (but surely) lose those extra pounds.

Rules of Weight Loss. To lose one pound, you must burn approximately 3500 calories  over and above what you already burn doing daily activities.

   1.  Calculate your BMR  (basal metabolic rate). Your BMR is what your body needs to maintain normal functions like breathing, digestion, etc.

   2. Calculate your activity level. Use a calorie calculator to figure out how many calories you burn while sitting, standing, exercising, lifting weights, etc. throughout the day.

   3. Keep track of how many calories you eat. Use a food journal to add up what you eat and drink during the day. If you’re eating less calories than you’re burning, you’ll lose weight.

Setting weight loss goals is probably one of the more difficult things to do when you embark on an exercise and/or diet program. How much do you need to lose? That question is hard to answer and often based on your particular goals. If you’re losing weight for your health, your goal might be more modest, say 5-10% of your current weight. But what if you have something more specific in mind like a certain clothing-size you want to fit into? How do you set a reasonable goal for yourself?

The key to setting weight loss goals is to follow the standard of goal setting. It needs to be specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and tangible. Your first step is determining if you really need to lose weight.

Do You Need to Lose Weight? If you talk to most people, you’ll probably find that everyone feels like they need to lose weight, even people who appear to be at a healthy weight. Often our weight loss goals are based on what we think we should look like rather than what’s reasonable for our bodies right now.

In general, a candidate for weight loss may have the following characteristics:

    * A BMI of more than 25
* A Waist-Hip ratio of higher than .8 for women and higher than 1.0 men
* An Abdominal Girth measurement of more than 35 inches in women and 40 inches in men

Of course, those aren’t the only clues that tell us we need to lose weight. There are those annoying indications like tight clothes, getting out of breath doing simple activities, or stepping on a scale for the first time in awhile. But, before you set goals based on what you think you should weigh, make sure you really need to lose weight.

Set Your Goals

If you’ve determined you do need to lose weight, your next step is to set a reasonable weight loss goal for yourself. You can base your goals on any number of factors, but a great place to start would be the general recommendations set out by the American College of Sports Medicine which are 5-10% of body weight or one to two pounds per week.